Where has the time gone…?

Hey guys, I’m finally back with a normal Blog post. The last five Blog posts were all about my time in Ireland. But since we’ve been to Ireland from the 20th to 27th of August, I’ve been back here in London for three weeks now and it’s been nearly two month since I started my year. I can tell you, time flies!

But first of all I want to try to catch up with all that has happened the last few weeks.

You already know that we came back on Saturday, 27th August. On Sunday, 28th August I had my usual day off and since I’ve missed out on a whole week here in London I made plans to meet Maja again, the one Au Pair I went to see in Brixton the Thursday before we left for Ireland.

At 2.45pm I took the Tube to Warren Street, where I then met Maja. Together we walked down Tottenham Court Road until we came upon Oxford Street. We then just strolled around Oxford Street and went in a few shops, but never actually bought something. Until we came across a new pop up store, where we were able to buy clothes of good quality to a bargain price.

Later that day we sat down in a small Caffé Nero and started to plan the next day. At 6.45pm we said goodbye for the day, knowing that we’re going to see each other again the following day, and went home.

Since Monday, 29th August was a bank holiday here in England, I had another day off. At 11am I went to catch the tube, because Maja and I wanted to visit the Notting Hill Carnival.
At my tube station I first met Amelie. She is an Au Pair, too and lives on the other side of the Tube station, thus in the same part of London. Since our host families know each other, our host moms made us come in contact. Maja and I asked her to accompany us, so she would get to know some Au Pairs here.

At 11.30am Amelie and I left Woodside Park and drove to Euston, where we met Maja and took the tube to Notting Hill Gate. When we left the Tube station we were already in the middle of the Carnival, but decided to go further into Notting Hill. After we bought us each a flower crown we found ourselves a spot on the sidewalk of Westbourne Grove, where we watched two parts of the Notting Hill Carnival Parade.
The Parade reminds of the original Carnival in Rio. There is lots of music, colourful and fancy dresses and everyone is dancing.

After we saw the short part of the Parade we went to get something to eat and then went on. The food at the Carnival is really good. There are lots of booths which offer grilled corn cobs and lots of different grilled meats. Other booths offer a big variety of cocktails, fruit punches and other drinks.
Even though the alcohol consumption reminded me of a german carnival, we stayed completely sober.

We walked down the complete Portobello Road and went back to where we bought our lunch earlier that day. After we were stuck in the big crowds more than one time we decided to go back to the Tube station via a side street.

The Notting Hill Carnival is not that bad, there is lots of music and the people there are all in such a good mood. But the only thing is that there are just too many people. If anything would happen, there would be no chance for the police to keep control of the situation.
After I went there I have to say that it’s nice to go there to have seen it once, but I wouldn’t go there a second time.

The next few days were really nice. Since N. has been off devices, we actually had the chance to bond. Not only could I show him how to do Origami, but he also started drawing a lot and we baked some Rocky Roads together.

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N. and my Rocky Road masterpieces!

On Wednesday I received the first letter of my pen pal from Trier. It was really nice to read those few lines from home. Because I had some free hours that day I decided to answer her directly and send a birthday postcard to my mum’s best friend (Happy belated Birthday! 🎉).

Since Amelie’s Au pair girl and N. had been in the same class up until this year, because S. changed the school, we organised a playdate for Friday. We met at 11am and went to the park near our home, where the kids played a bit tennis. When we were back at the house at 12.30pm, Amelie and I started to prepare lunch: Pancakes, or rather Crêpes, while S. and N. tried to do some Origami.
After Lunch Amelie and S. went back home and N. and I drew a bit for the rest of the day.

Normally I’m off work on the weekends, but my host parents asked me to babysit on saturday night, so I had only half the day off. Therefore I just spent some time with Amelie on the High Road of North Finchley and we went down to Finchley Central.
On our way to Finchley Central we visited the Victoria Park, which is a really nice park.
When I was back home the boys and I had a nice self made Pizza for dinner.

On Sunday Maja came to North Finchley to see where Amelie and I live. After we showed her our rather small High Road, we took the bus and drove to Muswell Hill. We arranged to meet other Au Pairs here, since Muswell Hill is in the middle between North Finchley and Crouch End, where the other girls live.
It all started with a small group, but in the end we were eight girls. Because of this rather large group we decided to just sit down in a Café and talk a bit to get to know each other. Even though we were seven german girls we had to speak english so the one swedish girl was able to understand us.
At 5.30pm Amelie and I went back home and left the other girls to mingle for a bit longer.

The next week started with a rather relaxed monday, because both boys could stay at home the whole day. But on Tuesday the chaos began. N. had to be at Rugby practice for 9.45am till 3pm, while S. was free until he had to go to a school event at 4pm.
Wednesday got even more confusing, not for N. but for S. It started with a birthday party at 11am, from there he went to school for training and I had collect him there at 5pm and bring him directly to his tennis practice. N.’s plan for the day was quite easy since he had Rugby from 9.45am to 3pm again. But mixing them both together was very interesting and gave me a preview on how it’s going to be as soon as the boys start school again.

With Thursday the day has finally arrived. The boys are back to school. To make it easier for me, my host mother stayed home from work the first two mornings to show me everything.

I have to be downstairs around 6.45-6.50am every morning to prepare breakfast. At 7.40am we would leave the house and I drop off the boys at their now different schools, because S. starts senior school this year. I then drive back home and have free time until I have collect the boys again. Although I should do my part of the house work during these few hours so I can concentrate on the boys when they’re back from school.

Not only  did the boys had their first school day on Thursday but I had to mind them in the evening, too. The good thing is that they’re quite old already so I just have to sent them to bed and watch that they turn off their lights and that’s it. The only downside is that they are allowed to stay up later now, so I get to bed later, too.

In return for working late on Thursday night I got more free time on friday and the complete afternoon and evening off. I just had to bring S. to school, since N. had to be there an hour earlier. When I came back I ironed quickly and were off till 3.30pm when I had to collect N. and his friend. But again my host mum drove to show me a few things around the school. Back at home I was free and could do what I want.

On Saturday I met Amelie again and after she spent a bit of time at my home we catched a bus to Muswell Hill again. Since we didn’t really had the time to explore the shops there last Sunday we wanted to come back. I showed her my two favourite shops there: Art for Art’s Sake and Oliver Bonas. We then went to a Oxfam Bookstore, where we were able to buy some really good books for a few pounds only. After a small lunch break we took another bus to drive to High Barnet.

Normally High Barnet is just two more stops with the Northern Line from our Tube Station, but the Northern Line didn’t work between High Barnet and Archway on Saturday and Sunday.
In High Barnet we went along the High Road and visited a lot of Secondhand shops. They are really great to get books for less money. The last shop we went into was a sweets store which had a big range of baking supplies.

At 6.20pm I took the bus back home, while Amelie met another Au Pair. I would have liked to stay with them, but at 7pm that night the Last Night of the Proms started at the Royal Albert Hall and I wanted to watch the live TV coverage. With 15 minutes to show begin I was even able to cook a pizza for the perfect TV night. The live TV broadcast in Germany only covered the second part of the Proms. But I then called my mum and we commented the Proms watching it from two different countries.

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Watching the Last Night of the Proms

On Sunday, 11th September, we had a small Au Pair meet up from the smartaupairs agency. It started at 11.30am in the Starbucks on Oxford Street. At 11.20am we were already 29 people and there were more and more coming. In the end we must have been over 40 people and we blocked nearly the whole second floor. After everyone introduced himself we got together into smaller groups where we tried to get to know each other a bit better. My group consisted of four german girls (me included) and one from Netherlands and Sweden each. We went down Oxford Street to Bond Station from there we separated and everyone went their own way, but before we exchanged numbers so we could stay in contact and meet again.

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I feel quite happy that I got to meet those really nice girls!

I went back to Starbucks, because Amelie was still there with a group of german girls. We stayed there for a bit more and talked about the places we come from in Germany and it turned out that one of the girls just lives in the neighbour city of Trier. At 3pm we went on Oxford Street and visited several stores. Afterwards we went to McDonald’s for a small dinner and at 7.45pm I was back home.
It was really nice to meet so many Au Pairs and get the chance to exchange numbers to stay in contact. Hopefully we can see each other again.

I’ll tell you about the following week in my next post.
Thank you for reading and following my blog so far.

See you next time

Vicky xx

In Dublin’s fair city

I started my one day in Dublin’s city centre on O’Connell Street at around 11.15 am on a beautiful sunday morning.

The first thing on my schedule was to find a cash dispenser, because for the first time in three weeks I needed Euro again. After I finally got cash I went back to the first bus stop of the green Dublin Sightseeing Hop-on Hop-off Buses at Cathal Brugha Street (1.) and hopped on the bus standing there. To buy a ticket for 24 hours you have to pay 19€ or if you are a student you just have to pay 17€. You can buy the ticket directly from the driver.

Doing that I got to talk to the bus driver and he asked me where I’m from and was quite happy to learn that I’m from germany and welcomed me with a nice ‘Guten Tag!‘ on his bus.

Starting the tour he introduced himself as Kevin and welcomed everyone on the bus, but especially the german people, because he’s taken german lessons for quite a while and was happy to have an opportunity to finally put some of the knowledge to use.
So he told us that he can say three sentences in german:
– ‘Ich heiße Kevin.
– ‘Ich bin 33 Jahre alt.
– ‘Mein Deutsch ist schei*e!

While he was enchanting us with his german skills he drove on the O’Connell Street (2.), where we passed the GPO (General Post Office), The Spire and the statue of Daniel O’Connell. The O’Connell Street is the widest and most famous street Ireland’s. It’s also full of history as it has been the location for key turning points in the history of the state.

Crossing the River Liffey we drove further into the centre of Dublin. The next stop was on Nassau Street (3.) in front of the Trinity College. Just a few metres down the street was the next stop at the National Library & Museum (4.). Sadly I couldn’t visit all the Museums, because I had just this one day. The good thing is that most of the Museums and other exhibitions are admission free, especially if there is a ‘National’ in the name. So you can enjoy all that without any extra paying, if you have the time.

The next sight was the Merrion Square (5.) with a memorial sculpture of Oscar Wilde. The Square is the largest Georgian square in the city and is surrounded by original Georgian buildings. Across the street is the National Gallery which houses over 15,000 works of Irish art and was officially opened in 1864. The National History Museum & Leinster House (6.) came up next. The latter one is the seat of the Irish Parliament since 1922. Dáil Éireann (House of Representatives) and Seanad Éireann (the Senate) are the two houses of parliament in Leinste House.

St Stephan’s Green is the largest city square in Europe. Open to the public you can see lots of commemorative monuments to some of Ireland’s historical figures. St Stephan’s Green and the Little Museum of Dublin (7.) share the same stop. The Little Museum of Dublin is voted ‘Dublin’s best Museum experience’ by the Irish Times and offers an exclusive free tour for customers on the Dublin Bus Tour. From St. Stephan’s Green Kevin drove us past the Mansion House, which has been the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin since 1715, and St. Ann’s Church on Dawson Street.

Because of the street system the bus had to drive back to Trinity College and went around the park of Trinity College to bring us after a short stop on Pearse Street (7a.) onto Dame Street. On Dame Street the bus stopped for the Molly Malone statue (8.) and the Temple Bar district (9.), where we passed the Olympia Theatre. The multi-award-winning Irish musical drama Once is running there. We then passed Dublin Castle & City Hall (10.).

At the end of Dame Street we turned onto Patrick Street and passed Christ Church Cathedral (11.) for the first time.
On Patrick Street you can see St. Patrick’s Cathedral (12.) and Marsh’s Library. St Patrick’s Cathedral is The National Cathedral for the Church of Ireland (Anglican) Community in Ireland and was built in 1192. Marsh’s Library was built in 1701 and became the first public library in Dublin.

After St. Patrick’s Cathedral Kevin made a small detour to Teeling Whiskey Distillery (12a.), which is the only operational distillery in Dublin city, and then brought us back to Christ Church Cathedral. From there he brought us directly to the Guinness Storehouse (13.) where he showed us around the whole area and even stopped in front of the famous black gate so we could take some pictures.

The next stop was the Irish Museum of Modern Art -IMMA (14.) and Kilmainham Gaol (15.). Before we could cross the river again we passed the biggest Public Transportation Station in Dublin: Heuston Station (16.). Back on the north side o the river it was now time for Phoenix Park (17.). It is the largest urban park in Europe. On the 1750 acres you can find the Dublin Zoo, the 62m high Wellington Monument and the home of the Irish president: Áras an Uachtaráin.

On our way to Old Jameson Distillery we passed the stops Ryan’s Victorian Bar (18.) and the National Museum of Ireland Decorative Arts & History (19.) and is housed in a formerly military barracks. After the Old Jameson Distillery (20.) we drove along the Liffey, past the Four Courts (21.), the Ha’Penny and the Millennium Bridge to the stop of the Dublin Discovered Cruise (22.).

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The National Museum of Ireland Decorative Arts & History

Finally we were back on the O’Connell Street (23.), turned at Dublin City Gallery & Writers Museum (24.) and then were back at the first stop at Cathal Brugha Street (1.).

During the whole Tour Kevin guided us through Dublin’s city with witty comments and interesting facts about Ireland. Though he would not only share facts and comments but also jokes, which were quite funny and when there was a longer drive between two stops he would even start singing!

While he started his third song I started sending voice messages to my mother so she could listen to his musical talent. She was so amused and enthused by him that she literally told me to stay on that bus until the end! But even if she wouldn’t have told me that, I would have stayed there because it was just such a great experience.
And I’m still happy that I recorded some of the songs because sometimes I just like to listen to them and be remembered of the good time.

Some of the songs he sang are well known as Molly Malone, The Wild Rover and With a littlehelp of my friends. But also some typical irish songs like Aon Focal Eile, The ABC Song and Seven Drunken Nights, which all sound like some songs the irish would sing after a bit of time in an irish pub.

At the end of the tour I was quite upset that it was already over, but I was also anxious to finally go through Dublin myself rather than on a bus.
Saying goodbye to Kevin I thanked him and told him to take a look on my blog, because I promised him I’ll write about this more than just great bus tour through Dublin.
So if you read this Kevin: Thanks again for the tour! I’ll always keep it in mind and if I’m going to be in Dublin again, I’ll make sure to visit you on your bus again!

After the two hour drive through Dublin I went into Carrols. If you’ve been to Ireland you know exactly what that means. For all the other ones: Carrols is a shop especially for Tourists. In these stores you’ll find everything you may think is irish, all the irish stereotypes are proved to be true. The bigger the store the more stuff they have – it’s a tourism wonderland.

Since my shopping spree wasted a lot of my time I was rather in a hurry afterwards and went to the GPO on O’Connell Street to buy a post stamp and to visit this historical building. It was here that the Proclamation of Independence was read in the 1916 Easter Rising. Because the Irish rebels fought against the british soldiers from inside the GPO, part of the building was destroyed. Today it is rebuild and still a post office, but also houses a museum and the GPO Witness History Visitor centre.

While I was still on the O’Connell Street, I also went to see the Spire of Dublin, or as it’s called in Dublin: the Spike. It’s location once was the location of another monument. The in 1808 built Nelson’s Pillar is named after the British hero Lord Nelson and was destroyed in 1966 by the Irish Republican Army Terrorist Organization, who were fighting British rule in Northern Ireland and didn’t want a British monument in Dublin. The 120m Spire of Dublin is the tallest sculpture and was built to celebrate the millennium, however it wasn’t finished until 2003.

Because of my 24 hour bus ticket I was able to get on another Dublin Tour bus and drive to Trinity College. It is Ireland’s oldest college, founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I. On Campus Grounds you can find the Trinity College Library, which holds the largest collection of manuscripts and printed books in Ireland. Under the Legal Deposit requirement of 1801, one copy of every published book must be sent to Trinity College Dublin. As a result the College Library now has a book stock of over six million books, manuscripts and maps.

Two of the greatest treasures of Trinity College Dublin is the Book of Kells and the Long Room in the College Library building. Arriving at the Library just a few minutes before they closed I was able to visit the exhibition of the Book of Kells and see the Long Room. Normally you would have wait in a 4 h+ queue to see the exhibition.

Around the year 800 Irish monks from the Island of Iona produced The Book of Kells, which is a lavishly decorated Gospel manuscript. The Book of Kells was sent to Dublin around 1653 for reasons of security during the Cromwellian period.

The Exhibition first shows images from that time and explains the Book of Kells. They also showed how it must have been made and other stuff from that time. Leaving that room I came in the room where The Book of Kells was exhibited in a showcase. I was told that they turn the pages of the book once every day, so you would have to visit the exhibiton every day for a year to see the whole book. The Book is pretty amazing and you can see how much work they must have put into making them.

The next part of the exhibition was the visit of the Long Room on the first floor of the old Library. It is nearly 65 metres long and houses around 200 000 of the Library’s oldest books. Marble busts are placed down either side of the room. (Just a few of them)

The Harp, which you can find on irish coins, is displayed in the middle of the room. It is the oldest to survive from Ireland, and probably dates from the 15th century. The Harp is constructed from oak and willow with bass strings and is an emblem of early, bardic society.
Right next to the door, through which you enter the Long Room, you can see one of the dozen or so remaining copies of the 1916 Proclamation of the Irish Republic.

Leaving the Exhibition I left the Trinity College behind and drove to Dublin’s City Hall. From there I walked to Christ Church Cathedral, which is one of Dublin’s most famous cathedrals and it is the original cathedral of Norse Dublin. Then I went straight back to Dublin Castle that is located slightly behind the City Hall. The British ruled Ireland from here until 1922.
But because I was short on time I just took some pictures from the outside.

Across the City Hall a road lead directly into Dublin’s Cultural quarter: Temple Bar. The earliest Dublin map to include Temple Bar is from 1673 and therefore it is one of the oldest parts of Dublin. I just took my time strolling around the pedestrianized streets. The atmosphere there is really great and dominated by all the restaurants, pubs, music venues and the people on the streets. Everyone in the streets seemed to be pulled in by the most famous pub, the Temple Bar. There is a theory that this unusual name comes from Sir William Temple, who lived in the area in the early 1600s.

Following the streets of Temple Bar, I reached the Ha’Penny Bridge. Which again is a quite unusual name. The original name of the Bridge, which has been built in 1816, was Wellington Bridge. In 1836 the name was changed to Liffey Bridge. However it is commonly called the Ha’Penny Bridge as a toll was charged on the Bridge up to March 1919.
The Ha’Penny Bridge is just one of many Bridges you can use to cross the 125 km River Liffey. However the Ha’Penny Bridge and the Millennium Bridge are two of the most famous ones.

The last thing on my Dublin Bucket list was to have a stroll around Dame and Grafton Street. The latter one being the premier shopping street in the capital. Going from Dame Street to Grafton Street I passed by the Molly Malone Statue and the St Andrews Church. The Statue is a reminder of the song of the same name. The statue has been constructed to celebrate the city’s first millennium in 1988. In Dublin the statue is commonly known as ‘The Tart with the Cart‘. The song is set in Dublin and tells the story about a fishmonger, who died young, of a fever. It is quite popular in Ireland and has become the unofficial anthem of Dublin city.

In Dublin’s fair city

Where the girls are so pretty,

I first set my eyes on sweet Molly Malone,

As she wheeled her wheel-barrow,

Through streets broad and narrow,

Crying, “Cockles and mussels, alive, alive, oh!”

“Alive, alive, oh,

Alive, alive, oh,”

Crying “Cockles and mussels, alive, alive, oh”.

She was a fishmonger,

But sure ’twas no wonder,

For so were her father and mother before,

And they wheeled their barrows,

Through the streets broad and narrow,

Crying, “Cockles and mussels, alive, alive, oh!”

(chorus)

She died of a fever,

And no one could save her,

And that was the end of sweet Molly Malone.

But her ghost wheels her barrow,

Through streets broad and narrow,

Crying, “Cockles and mussels, alive, alive, oh!”

(chorus)x2

source

Getting quite tired I decided to walk back to O’Connell Street to have a little break at Caffé Nero. I then used the break to write a postcard to a friend of mine. I chose to sent only her a postcard from Ireland, because back in 2013-2014 she’s been an Au Pair in Dublin and had sent me a postcard. She inspired me to be an Au Pair myself, so I thought it would be suitable to sent her a postcard from Dublin back.
After writing the postcard I put it in the post box, which was right outside the Caffé.

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A little greeting from Ireland to one special Lady!

At 7.30 pm I finally decided to take the bus home. When I found the right bus stop (Bus stop 320: Westmoreland Street), I saw that I’d have to wait for 30 minutes. At 8 o’clock the bus arrived and I bought a ticket for 2,70€. When you want to buy a bus ticket in Ireland, you have to pay the right amount, because the won’t give you the change back.

After being out of the house for 9 3/4 hours, I was quite happy when I came back home at 8.45 pm.

I then spent the rest of the evening in the living room with the family we talked about the day we had. When I went to bed I fell asleep right away, because the day was just too exhausting.
I definitely have to go to Dublin again, then even though I saw a lot during that day, I didn’t even saw half of the things you have to visit in Dublin.

As I talked a lot about the Dublin Sightseeing Tour I was clearly thrilled with the tour and I can highly recommend them. If you’re interested you can take a look on their website http://www.dublinsightseeing.ie or just click here. Also I wrote down all the Bus stops of the tour for you. After the name of the bus stop you’ll find the number of the bus stop inside the parentheses and they are all marked in bold purple letters.
When you want to experience the same fun ride, make sure to hop on a ‘Live Commentary‘ bus and the chances that you’ll meet Kevin are way higher.

If you want to read more about my days in Ireland, please follow this blog and you’ll be one of the first to see the new posts.

Until then,
fheiceann tú arís

Vicky xx

All the information about the places are either from the Dublin Sightseein.ie Discount Map & Guide, A pictorial Guide to Trinity College Dublin or my own memory.

All the little things

It’s my third week being here in London as an au pair. You would think that by now I would be used to it, but I’m not!

With the boys still being on their summer holidays it’s quite hard to get into a routine because no week is like the one before and there a weeks where every day is something complete different. To add to that I have to find my way through the new household.

When you want to apply to become an au pair it’s always useful when you are used to do some household chores at home. But when you then arrive at your host families home you sometimes have to relearn all these things because they just have a different way of doing them.

While getting used to the new surroundings and the work and everything, you have to try to bond with the family.
I won’t lie, at this moment I still have my problems with that. During the day the boys are often gone to sports club and when they come back they want to relax for a bit and spend their time on their devices. When they finally want to go out into the garden, where I then could join them, I have to start preparing dinner.
It’s not that easy, at least it’s not for me. When I first started I was happy that the boys I have to look after are quite old already, but now I understand that they are at this age where they don’t really want to have an au pair because they fell like they’re too old for it, which makes it even harder for me to bond with them.
But I hope that we’ll work things out and connect in the right way when time goes on.

Apart from this I quite enjoy staying here. The boy’s age can be a good thing too. Because of their age I have quite a lot of free time I can spend as I like, except for doing the laundry.

Last weekend the family planned to drive to Oxfordshire to visit my host mother’s sister and her family and I was allowed to join them.
So we left the London home on Friday at around 2 pm and arrived at around 4 pm in Oxfordshire in the small village they live in.
The sister has two daughters, who are 5 and 8 years old. I enjoyed playing with them and doing their hair and let them do mine.

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My hair done by my host mothers niece. I especially love the nice bow.

On Saturday they gave me the opportunity to drive into Oxford. But I’ll write about it in an extra blog entry so you can have all the details.

On Sunday we packed everything to go back to London. But before we could leave Oxfordshire the family showed us the highest hills in Oxfordshire, called the Clumps.

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Climbing the first Clump.

We actually made it and mounted the first of the two Clumps.

Going round the first clump we were able to see the second clump. After descending the first one we climbed up the second one and took a look around there.

On the second clumb we found the poet tree as you can see in the pictures above.

This stone commemorates the 150th anniversary of the poem carved on the nearby beech tree by Joseph Tubb of Warborough Green in 1844-1845. The text above is from a tracing made in 1965 by Dr. Henry Osmasten. The Northmoor Trust gratefully acknowledges the support of the National Westminster Bank, celebrating 150 years of a bank on their site in Wallingford, and ARC Southern for providing the stone.

This text is the third paragraph written on the plate. The poem is also written down there in the first two paragraphs.

“As up the hill with labr’ing steps we treed
Where the twin Clumps their sheltering branches spread
The summit gain’d at ease reclining lay
And all around the wide spread scene survey
Point out each object and instructive tell
The various changes that the land befel.
Where the low bank the country wide surrounds
That ancient earthwork form’d old Murcias bounds.
In misty distance see the barrow heave
There lies, forgotten lonely Culchems grave.
Around this hill the ruthless Danes intrenched
And these fair plains with glory slaughter drench’d
While at our feet where stands that stately tower
In later days appeared monastic pride.
Within that field where lies the grazing herd
Huge walls were found, some coffins disinter’d
Such is the course of time, the wreck which fate
And awful doom award the earthly great.”

After this little lyric lesson we went back to the car, drove to a small café to have a little lunch before we finally made our way back home.

On Monday I’ve received a little surprise from home. My family had sent me a little packet with the last few things I couldn’t take with me on the plane.

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The small packet..

Okay, it’s not that small and it only weighed 26 kg…. But I was only allowed to take a 20kg luggage with me on the plane. The cleaning lady helped me carrying it upstairs to my room because it was just too heavy. But I can tell you how happy I am to finally have all the things I need!
Thank you Mama for packing everything up (you need to come to England in on years time to help me pack everything again to ship it back to Germany)! Thank you my favourite sister for adding the things I forget to tell you on time to pack them! Thank you grandfather for shipping it over to me and paying for it! I have the best family!

Because the boys were at cricket camp every morning this week, I was asked to bake something for the family while I’m at home alone so I would have some treats for the boys.
So I decided to bake some chocolate muffins with cherries inside!
When I came back down on Tuesday morning I found a small note attached to the container: “Delicious!!”

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My self-made muffins in the container with the attached note: “Delicious!!”

I thought it was quite a nice thing to see early in the morning and I felt thankful to receive the compliment and it also picked up my tired morning mood.

This week isn’t easy for me. I’ve been away from home a few times before. Even farther than just London. But I’ve always been away for two weeks and never more. So this week being my third, is the one week that makes the difference to all the other trips I’ve done before. So I got really homesick a few times this weeks.
And I am really thankful for the cleaning lady for giving me advice on how to deal with the situation and just listened and made me feel better. She is a Blessing! 😉

One of her very useful advises was that I need to have a social life for my free time. Because I had free all Thursday afternoon and night I made plans with another au pair to meet up. The only problem is that she lives on the other side of London. So I made my way all the way down to south London. I took the Northern line tube and drove down to Euston where I transferred to a Victorian line tube (yes, I’ve got my own tube line 😉 ) and drove further down to Brixton. Finally there I got to make my first contact with another aupair!

We first went to a market where we sat down in a small Pizzeria to drink a Lemonade and to share a Pizza. We had a great time together and hopefully will see each other lots of times again.

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Organic Lemonade at Franco Manca

Because this post is about all the little things I want to share one last thing that is kinda important to me this week. In Oxford I finally used one of the Postboxes to send my best friend a letter, which she gladly received already. We decided that we want to stay in contact not only by social media, but also by becoming pen pals. So I made the first the step and sent the first letter and I can’t wait to get a letter back.

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For my best friend!

That’s it for now. Next week I’ll be going to Ireland and I’ll tell you all about it when I come back.

Until then,
Love

Vicky xx